Sterne and Hogarth in parallel
by A. Torelli, E. Notti

INTRODUCTION
Structure of the hypertext

 


CULTURAL BACKGROUND


John Loche
Changes
Samuel Johnson
A quotation
Biography
Coffee Houses
Händel

 


COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSES


Art
Music
Philosophy
Theatre

 


HOGARTH BIOGRAPHY


Gin Lane and Beer Street
Masquerades and Operas

 


STERNE BIOGRAPHY


Satire

 


WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON


Lines
David Garrick
Analysis of Beauty
Addison
Shaftesbury

  

The Analysis of Beauty

On 24 March 1752 Hogarth announced the Analysis of beauty in his friend Henry Fielding's Covent-Garden Journal then he sent a copy to Thomas Birch for the Royal Society's library . His attempt was to live up to the Renaissance humanist ideal of a scolarly and lettered artist who paints poetry and generalises his principles in writing. Before publishing his work Hogarth had included a Line of Beauty on the palette in the self-portrait, Gulielmus Hogarth, he utilized as a frontispiece for his folios of engravings.1 That was an engraving dated 1749 while the painting, Hogarth with his pug, is dated 1745. In his preface he said: "I drew a serpentine line lying on a painter's pallet, with these words under it, THE LINE OF BEAUTY. The bait soon took; and no Egyptian hierogliphic ever amused more than it did for a time, painters and sculptors came to me to know the meaning of it, being as much puzzled with it as other people, till it came to have some explanation; then indeed, but not till then, some found it out to be an old acquaitance of theirs, tho'the account they could give of its properties was very near satisfactory as that which a day-labourer who constantly uses the leaver could give of that machine as mechanical power.2" His enthusiastic talk of the Line of Beauty had elicited the skepticism of his collegues, which led him to theorize it. David Garrick jocurlary wrote Hogarth in 1746 " I have been lately allarm'd with some Encroachments of my Belly upon the Line of Grace and Beauty, in short I am growing very fat"3 . In his preface Hogarth himself knew well that his argument was anti-academic and that it was written against the interest of connoisseurs, theorists of art and artists themselves so in his preface he said "it will naturally encounter with, and perhaps may overthrow, several long received and thorough establih'd opinions and since controversies may arise how, and after what manner this subject hath hithertho been consider'd and treated, it will also be proper to lay before the reader, what may be gathered concerning it, from the works of the ancient and modern writers and painters.4" The first aesthetic treatises were the third earl of Shaftesbury's "Characteristicks"(1711) and Joseph Addison's "Pleasures of the imagination"essays in The Spectator of 1712. 5

Analysis of Beauty plate 1 (1753)

Analysis of Beauty plate 2 (1753)

Notes

1 See p. xviii introduction William Hogarth the Analysis of Beauty edited with an introduction and notes by Ronald Paulson New Haven; London; Yale University press 1997

2 See p. 6 Prefazione William Hogarth the Analysis of Beauty edited with an introduction and notes by Ronald Paulson New Haven; London; Yale University press 1997

3 See p. xviii William Hogarth the Analysis of Beauty edited with an introduction and notes by Ronald Paulson New Haven; London; Yale University press 1997

4 See preface William Hogarth the Analysis of Beauty edited with an introduction and notes by Ronald Paulson New Haven; London; Yale University press 1997

5 See p.xix William Hogarth the Analysis of Beauty edited with an introduction and notes by Ronald Paulson New Haven; London; Yale University press 1997