Sterne and Hogarth in parallel
by A. Torelli, E. Notti

INTRODUCTION
Structure of the hypertext

 


CULTURAL BACKGROUND


John Loche
Changes
Samuel Johnson
A quotation
Biography
Coffee Houses
Händel

 


COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSES


Art
Music
Philosophy
Theatre

 


HOGARTH BIOGRAPHY


Gin Lane and Beer Street
Masquerades and Operas

 


STERNE BIOGRAPHY


Satire

 


WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON


Lines
David Garrick
Analysis of Beauty
Addison
Shaftesbury 

  

Addison

He was the other founding father of aesthetics in England, and for Hogarth a more congenial figure than Shaftesbury. The pleasure Addison associated with the novel were surprise, the pursuit of knowledge, curiosity and variety. "It is this- he wrote,-that recommends variety, where the mind is every instant called off to something new and the attention not suffered to dwell too long and waste itself on any particular object". "It gratifies the soul's curiosity". Hogarth point of view is so close to Addison's: his aesthetic object is small, smooth and curved. He also picks up from Addison the sense of liberty which can be found in what he calls a "composed variety". Hogarth followed a process of abstraction according to his mnemonic system. His method consisted in "retaining in mind lineally such objects as fitted any purpose best", that is to draw by memory reducing scenes to mental diagrams. His aim is "to understand form by seeing it from within"; he asserted that "the scooping out of figures will give the artist perfect ideas of even the most irregular figures will gradually arrive at the knack of recalling them into his mind when the objects themselves are not before him".1

Notes

1 See The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 volumes ( 1907-21 ) volume X. the age of Johnson.