Sterne and Hogarth in parallel
by A. Torelli, E. Notti

INTRODUCTION
Structure of the hypertext

 


CULTURAL BACKGROUND


John Loche
Changes
Samuel Johnson
A quotation
Biography
Coffee Houses
Händel

 


COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSES


Art
Music
Philosophy
Theatre

 


HOGARTH BIOGRAPHY


Gin Lane and Beer Street
Masquerades and Operas

 


STERNE BIOGRAPHY


Satire

 


WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON


Lines
David Garrick
Analysis of Beauty
Addison
Shaftesbury

  

Masquerades and Operas

Crowds of people flock to Italian Opera. The earl of Peterborough is seen on his knees before Francesca Cuzzini, while in the backing ground rises the facade of Burlington House, the mansion of the earl of Burlington, the famous dilettante and collector of Italian pictures. It is labelled "Academy of Arts" (which became the headquarters of the Royal Academy later on) and is summoned by an effigy of William Kent. Therefore this is an attack on him as an empty-headed imitator of continental fashion. Kent was the mortal enemy of James Thornhill, who had started the first regular school of painting in England. Hogarth attended that school and there he developed his satiric skill and made his reputation thanks to his "conversation pieces".1

Masquerades and operas (1721)
See also http://www.haleysteele.com/hogarth/plates/operas.html

Notes