Sterne and Hogarth in parallel
by A. Torelli, E. Notti

INTRODUCTION
Structure of the hypertext

 


CULTURAL BACKGROUND


John Loche
Changes
Samuel Johnson
A quotation
Biography
Coffee Houses
Händel

 


COMPUTATIONAL ANALYSES


Art
Music
Philosophy
Theatre

 


HOGARTH BIOGRAPHY


Gin Lane and Beer Street
Masquerades and Operas

 


STERNE BIOGRAPHY


Satire

 


WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON


Lines
David Garrick
Analysis of Beauty
Addison
Shaftesbury

  

Samuel Johnson: a quotation

"No man but a blockhead,'' said Johnson, "ever wrote except for money". Johnson despised gentlemen who dabbled in his craft, as a man whose life is devoted to music or painting despises the ladies and gentlemen who treat those arts as fashionable accomplishments. An author was, according to him, a man who turned out books as a brick-layer turns out houses or a tailor coats. Johnson was not the first professional author in this sense, but perhaps the first man who made the profession respectable. Johnson suffered acutely and made some attempts to escape from his misery. Literature was thus perforce Johnson's sole support; and by literature was meant, for the most part, drudgery of the kind indicated by the phrase, "translating for book-sellers".1

Notes

1 Leslie Stevenson, Samuel Johnson. New York: the Macmillan Company.
See also
<http://eserver.org/18th/samuel-johnson.txt>